Tag Archive: nature

Birds and the Bees

I couldn’t really escape. There I was at the top of the 100ft /32m high tower being swarmed by angry bees. Nevermind that there were eight other people up on the tower–the bees weren’t… Continue reading

Birding Pipeline Road. Again.

No time to bask in the afterglow of stumbling on the crake. It’s time to press on and look for more surprises.

Birding Panama’s Ammo Dump Ponds

During World War II when the US had control of the Panama Canal the US stored ammunition in bunkers to protect the canal from the Japanese. It was in this military zone (called the… Continue reading

All alone in Panama

Whistling Herons are not even supposed to be in Panama. But sometimes birds go exploring. Or get swept away by wind and storms. Or, as in this case, went looking for food to… Continue reading

What a little sunshine will do

Our guide, Beny Wilson, assured me that the birds would be out in abundance after the rain stopped. I grew up in Oregon, so I’m used to rain. Lots of it. So getting… Continue reading

Birding Panama: Don’t let the rainy season deter you

Nothing foils a birding morning like rain. And not a light rain, but this kind of rain: This was our third trip to Panama. Our first trip was during March in 2012, at the peak of… Continue reading

Layer upon layer of birds

We were in the Big Bend National Park area for four days and two of those days we spent birding. Aside from the usual research we did in advance of our trip (Steve… Continue reading

West Texas Birding

  Chipping Sparrow   For all those people who think Texas is flat, you need to see see the Davis Mountains in West Texas. (Visit them before you go to Big Bend National Park, where those mountains… Continue reading

Wild courting

The first thing you’ll notice in West Texas is that the trees look thirsty. This is the desert and at Rattlesnake Springs–a preserve adjacent to Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico–there were plenty of towering Cottonwood trees… Continue reading

Looking for Whooping Cranes

Back in the 1930s the numbers of Whooping Cranes had declined significantly as a result of over hunting and encroachment on their habitat—so much that there were only 15 in existence.