Our first day in El Valle, Panama at Canopy Lodge only called for a 6:30 a.m. breakfast, which is not too early by birding standards. In fact, some might suggest that was a rather late start, but I trust the folks at Canopy Lodge to know what they’re doing and I’m not going to argue with a later start. Not at all.

So after a quick, hearty meal of scrambled eggs, ham, toast and yogurt we headed to the Chorro de Macho waterfall at the Canopy Adventure area for wet forest and foothills species and then to La Mesa and Cerro Gaital, which is primarily an agricultural area and where there are oodles of chicken farms. (Chickens weren’t really the kind of birds we were after, mind you.)

What birders do.

What birders do.

We were put with a group of other birders who had already been at the lodge and that, of course, worried me. It worried me because birders are always different. For instance, I’m a terrible hiker–I’m painfully slow and I still don’t like the slippery slopes and muddy terrain. Throw gravel and wet leaves in the mix and I panic. ¬†We had two hard-core birders in our group and nothing seemed to stop them and they didn’t seem to want anyone stopping them either.

Steve, I know, would like to go hard, hard, hard with the others, but he’s a great husband who helps me on the terrain that causes me angst. Our poor guide was left trying to figure out how to accommodate me and how to make sure his other customers were happy. I made things easier for him by telling him at lunch that I’d like to stay back and get a massage and let Steve head out with the group.

Good call, I think, for everyone. I had a great massage back at the lodge followed by a long nap while Steve had some great birding with the group.

The next day the Canopy Lodge folks arranged for Steve and I to have our own guide for the remainder of our stay. Good job, Canopy Lodge! You read your customers well and know how to accommodate to all types.

Here are some photos of some of the birds we saw on this day and some other random photos.

White-vented Plumeleteer

White-vented Plumeleteer

Walk across a treacherous bridge (well not really treacherous, but wobbly nonetheless)

Walk across a treacherous bridge (well not really treacherous, but wobbly nonetheless)

Squirrel Cuckoo

Squirrel Cuckoo

Scaley-crested Pygmy-Tyrant

Scalely-crested Pygmy-Tyrant

Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

Rufous Mourner

Rufous Mourner

Orange-bellied Trogon

Orange-bellied Trogon

A hummingbird faucet at Canopy Lodge

A hummingbird faucet at Canopy Lodge

Green Hermit

Green Hermit

The list

Here’s our list for this day. 107 species in one day! 25 Lifers for Steve; 23 Lifers for Lisa. (This is our combined list for the day. Unfortunately, we didn’t break it out for what Steve saw in the afternoon, so some of these species I didn’t see at all. I was busy getting a massage and taking a nap.) Lifers are in bold.

  1. Little Tinamou (heard)
  2. Gray-headed Chacalaca
  3. Cattle Egret
  4. Black Vulture
  5. Turkey Vulture
  6. White Hawk
  7. Broad-winged Hawk
  8. Southern Lapwing
  9. Ruddy Ground-Dove
  10. Squirrel Cuckoo
  11. Mottled Owl (Only Steve saw and was a lifer for him)
  12. Green Hermit
  13. Stripe-throated Hermit
  14. White-vented Plumeleteer
  15. Bronze-tailed Plumeleteer
  16. Violet-crowned Woodnymph
  17. Blue-chested Hummingbird
  18. Snow-bellied Hummingbird
  19. Rufous-tailed Hummingbird
  20. Orange-bellied Trogon
  21. Rufous Motmot
  22. Broadbilled Motmot
  23. Keel-billed Toucan
  24. Black-cheeked Woodpecker
  25. Lineated Woodpecker
  26. Blue-headed Parrot
  27. Great Antshrike (Only Steve saw and is a lifer for him)
  28. Barred Antshrike
  29. Plain Vireo
  30. Spot-crowned Antvireo
  31. Slaty Antwren
  32. Checker-throated Antwren
  33. Dusky Antbird
  34. Chestnut-backed Antbird
  35. Plain-brown Woodcreeper
  36. Wedge-billed Woodcreeper
  37. Cocoa Woodcreeper
  38. Spotted Woodcreeper
  39. Olive-striped Flycatcher
  40. Ochre-bellied Flycatcher
  41. Sepia-capped Flycatcher
  42. Paltry Tyrannulet
  43. Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant
  44. Common Tody-Flycatcher
  45. Black-headed Tody-Flycatcher (heard)
  46. White-throated Spadebill
  47. Sulpher-rumped Flycatcher
  48. Eastern Wood-Pewee
  49. Rufous Mourner
  50. Panama Flycatcher
  51. Boat-billed Flycatcher
  52. Social Flycatcher
  53. Gray-capped Flycatcher
  54. Tropical Kingbird
  55. Thrush-like Schiffornis (heard)
  56. Golden-collared Manakin (Only Steve saw and is a lifer for him)
  57. White-ruffed Manakin
  58. Lesser Greenlet
  59. Black-chested Jay
  60. Gray-breasted Martin
  61. Southern Rough-winged Swallow
  62. Scaly-breasted Wren (heard, but eventually saw a couple days later)
  63. House Wren
  64. Rufous-breasted Wren
  65. Rufous-and-white Wren (heard, but eventually saw a couple days later)
  66. Plain Wren
  67. Bay Wren
  68. White-breasted Wood-Wren
  69. Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (heard)
  70. Song Wren
  71. Tawny-faced Gnatwren
  72. Long-billed Gnatwren
  73. Orange-billed Nightingale-Thrush
  74. Swainson’s Thrush
  75. Clay-colored Thrush
  76. Golden-winged Warbler (Lifer for Lisa)
  77. Black-and-white Warbler
  78. Tennessee Warbler
  79. American Redstart
  80. Bay-breasted Warbler
  81. Blackburnian Warbler
  82. Chestnut-sided Warbler
  83. Buff-rumped Warbler
  84. Rufous-capped Warbler
  85. Canada Warbler
  86. Bananaquit
  87. Rosy Thrush-Tanager (heard him last year in Gamboa, but this was the first we saw him)
  88. Dusky-faced Tanager
  89. White-lined Tanager
  90. Crimson-backed Tanager
  91. Flame-rumped Tanager
  92. Blue-gray Tanager
  93. Palm Tanager
  94. Silver-throated Tanager
  95. Streaked Saltator
  96. Buff-throated Saltator
  97. Variable Seedeater
  98. Yellow-faced Grassquit
  99. Hepatic Tanager
  100. Summer Tanager
  101. Red-crowned Ant-Tanager
  102. Black-faced Grosbeak
  103. Great-tailed Grackle
  104. Yellow-backed Oriole
  105. Chestnut-headed Oropendola
  106. Thick-billed Euphonia
  107. Tawny-capped Euphonia