Right on the edge of Panama City is the Metropolitan Nature Park, which is just over 600 hectares. We didn’t need to be at Canopy Lodge until late afternoon so we decided to do some exploring of the park with our guide, Domiciano “Domi” Alveo, before we headed out of the city to El Valle. 

We didn’t need to go far before we found over 60 species of birds. Not a bad morning, especially when right out of the gates (or rather our car) we see the Common Potoo. We didn’t lock up a bunch of lifers (we have been to Panama before), but we did observe some great bird behavior, some of which I caught on camera. To be honest, that’s the fun part of birding. We’re not “tickers” or “listers” who see a bird, check our list, and move on quickly. No, we like to sit and watch interesting bird behavior. I learned a lot more about birds just in this one morning. It’s not a race, but the joy of observing and learning.

Not a great photo of the Common Potoo, I know.

Not a great photo of the Common Potoo, I know. BUT IT’S A POTOO, GUYS!

Orange-chinned Parakeets actually have their inside the termite nest.

Orange-chinned Parakeets actually have their nest inside the termite nest. No kidding.

Black-crowned Tityra (female)

Black-crowned Tityra (female) looking all pretty for us this morning.

Red-crowned Woodpecker (female) visiting a flower

Red-crowned Woodpecker (female) visiting a flower

This Black Hawk (juvenile) gives me a puzzled look.

This Black Hawk (juvenile) gives me a puzzled look.

We did most of our birding within sight distance of our car. I love mixed flocks for that reason--you don't have to travel very far to see a lot.

We did most of our birding within sight distance of our car. I love mixed flocks for that reason–you don’t have to travel very far to see a lot.

This flower has turned out to be popular, attracting also this Scarlet-rumped Cacique.

This flower has turned out to be popular, attracting also this Scarlet-rumped Cacique.

You don't want to hug this tree.

You don’t want to hug this tree.

Really, guys. You don't want to hug this thing.

Really, guys. You don’t want to hug this thing.

Blue Dacnis. When birds are lazy.

Blue Dacnis. When birds are lazy.

Streaked Flycatcher with caterpillar, but there's just one problem--it's got spiny things sticking out of it

Streaked Flycatcher with caterpillar, but there’s just one problem–it’s got spiny things.

So what's a Streaked Flycatcher to do? Well, beat the hell out of it. That's what.

So what’s a Streaked Flycatcher to do? Well, beat the hell out of it. That’s what.

The list

Here’s our bird list/count for the day. Like I said, we’re not listers, per se, except just to be organized in life and because I know people like to read about what species we saw.  Lifers are in bold.

  1. Brown Pelican
  2. Magnificent Frigate Bird
  3. Common Black Hawk
  4. Short-tailed Hawk
  5. Broad-winged Hawk
  6. Turkey Vulture
  7. Black Vulture
  8. Crested Caracara
  9. Yellow-headed Caracara
  10. White-tipped Dove
  11. Orange-chinned Parakeet
  12. Squirrel Cuckoo
  13. Common Potoo
  14. Rufous-tailed Hummingbird
  15. White-vented Plumeteer
  16. Keel-billed Toucan
  17. Red-crowned Woodpecker
  18. Crimson-crested Woodpecker
  19. Pain Xenops
  20. Cocoa Woodcreeper
  21. Fasciated Ant Shrike
  22. White-bellied Antbird
  23. Yellow-crowned Tyranulet
  24. Greenish Elania
  25. Yellow-olive Flycatcher
  26. Easter Wood Peewee
  27. Dusky-caped Flycatcher
  28. Streaked Flycatcher
  29. Topical Kingbird
  30. Black-crowned Tityra
  31. Lance-tailed Manikin (female)
  32. Red-capped Manikin (female)
  33. Golden-fronted Greenlit
  34. Gray-breasted Martin
  35. Lesser Greenlit
  36. Plain Wren
  37. House Wren
  38. Roufous-breasted Wren
  39. Rufous and White Wren (heard)
  40. Long-billed Gnatwren
  41. Golden-winged Warbler
  42. Tennessee Warbler
  43. Chestnut-sided Warbler
  44. Bay-breasted Warbler
  45. Northern Water Thrush (heard)
  46. White-shouldered Tanager
  47. Rosy-thrush Tanager
  48. Crimson-backed Tanager
  49. Blue-Gray Tanager
  50. Plain-colored Tanager
  51. Blue Dacnis
  52. Red-legged Honeycreeper
  53. Variable Seedeater
  54. Orange-billed Sparrow
  55. Black-striped Sparrow
  56. Sumer Tanager
  57. Red-throated Ant Tanager
  58. G. T. Grackle
  59. Yellow-backed Oriole
  60. Scarlet-rumped Cacique
  61. Yellow-crowned Euphonia
  62. Fulvous-vented Euphonia
  63. Grooved-billed Ani
  64. Orange Nectar Bat (at Canopy Lodge)

 Mammals

  1. Tamarin Monkeys (Red naped)
  2. Variegated Squirrel